Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Project Title: New Classes of Fluid Instabilities in 3D Printing of Soft Matter
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Thomas E. Angelini, t.e.angelini@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Tapomoy Bhattacharjee, tapomoy@ufl.edu, Christopher O’Bryan, csobryan@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior; 1-2 students per term
Prerequisites:  none
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Resume, UF unofficial transcripts, faculty interview; email one pdf file of your application materials to Thomas E. Angelini, t.e.angelini@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring Term
Website:  http://plaza.ufl.edu/t.e.angelini/people.html
Project Description: Technology for 3D printing with hard materials is in a very mature state; hobbyists can 3D print hard thermoplastics with high precision at low costs. Many important applications in medicine require the use of soft materials, like hydrogels and elastomers, which have the feel of Jell-O or soft rubber. The recent invention of a soft matter 3D printing technique at the University of Florida has opened the door to 3D printing precise objects made from soft matter.  However, the new combinations of complex soft materials involved in this 3D printing technique have generated unanticipated fluid instabilities.  The physical principles that control these instabilities have not yet been determined, limiting the ability to advance the technology.

Project Title: Center for Compressible Multiphase Turbulence
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Sivaramakrishnan “Bala” Balachandar, bala1s@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): TBD
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Sophomore, Junior, Senior; 1 student per semester
Prerequisites:  Fluid Mechanics, >3.80 GPA
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: $10 per hour up to 10 hours per week
Application Requirements: Basic online application, resume, UF unofficial transcripts, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to bala1s@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: none
Website:  https://www.eng.ufl.edu/ccmt/
Project Description: Center for Compressible Multiphase Turbulence (CCMT) is one of the six new PSAAP-II centers of excellence whose primary focus will be on the emerging field of predictive science The intellectual objectives of the proposed work are To radically advance the field of compressible multiphase turbulence (CMT) through rigorous physics-based understanding and To advance very large-scale predictive simulation science on present and near-future platforms. We are looking for outstanding undergraduate students interested in fluid mechanics and large scale modeling and simulations.

Project Title: Musculoskeletal Biomechanics, Measurement Techniques and Technologies, Robotics and Controls
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Scott Banks, banks@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): TBD
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: All levels; 3-6 students per semester
Prerequisites:  MAE major or CSE major preferred for technical projects, other majors can work for study support tasks. Considering graduate school a bonus. Facility or fondness for MATLAB, LabVIEW and/or C++ allows students to engage in more intellectually challenging and independent development tasks.
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: Industry sponsored projects sometimes permit students to be paid for their work; otherwise unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Basic online application, resume, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to Scott Banks, banks@ufl.edu, to request an interview.
Application Deadline: Best to contact within the weeks surrounding semester start.
Website:  http://www.mae.ufl.edu/people/banks
Project Description: Biomechanics of human and animal joints in healthy, injured and replaced states. Techniques and technologies for quantifying musculoskeketal biomechanics. Musculoskeletal modeling for surgical planning and treatment design. Medical robotics for surgery and research.  Research work with medical devices and joint replacement implants.

Project Title: Spacecraft Formation Flight, Space Robotics, Small Spacecraft, and Spacecraft-Atmosphere Interaction
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Riccardo Bevilacqua, bevilr@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Sanny Omar (sanny.omar@ufl.edu), Margaret Lawn (mlawn@ufl.edu), Patrick Kelly (pkelly89@ufl.edu)
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Junior, Senior; 2-3 students per semester
Prerequisites: Preference given to MAE majors and students interested in graduate school
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: preference to those selected for University Scholars – stipend may be considered after 1 semester probation
Application Requirements: Basic online application, resume, UF unofficial transcripts, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements and submit a short proposal for your research interest to Riccardo Bevilacqua, bevilr@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: always open
Website:  http://www.riccardobevilacqua.com/
Project Description: Various projects via the ADAMUS laboratory, contributing to expanding human presence in space.  The ADvanced Autonomous MUltiple Spacecraft laboratory (ADAMUS) specializes in hardware-in-the-loop ground experiments validating spacecraft relative motion guidance, navigation, and control, as well as proximity operations and maneuvers involving contact (on-orbit assembly, servicing, re-fueling). With its six-degrees-of-freedom air-bearing-based spacecraft simulator, the laboratory can reproduce the dynamics of free-flying spacecraft, creating a unique environment to consolidate algorithms to run on future satellites, as well as actual hardware subsystems. Contact dynamics models and tools for satellite servicing can also be tested at the ADAMUS facility. The ADAMUS laboratory bridges the gap between computer numerical simulations and actual orbital flight.

Project Title: Understanding the Physics of Heat Transfer Using Atomistic Simulation
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Youping Chen, ypchen2@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): TBD
Terms Available: Spring
Student Level: Junior, Senior; 2 students per semester
Prerequisites:  Calculus II, Thermodynamics, Computer Programing
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: None unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: resume, UF unofficial transcripts, statement of research interest, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to ypchen2@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring term
Website:  http://www2.mae.ufl.edu/chenlab/
Project Description: Advances in time-resolved experimental studies of phonon transport have opened a new realm of phenomena and posed a great challenge for the simulation community to interpret the experiments. This project uses atomistic and multiscale simulation methods to simulate, visualize, and predict phonon transport processes and phenomena in nonmetal materials.

Project Title: Microfabrication and Microfluidics
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Hugh Fan, hfan@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): none
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Junior, Senior, 1 student a term
Prerequisites:  none
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: resume, UF unofficial transcripts, faculty interview; a brief email stating your research interest, with attached resume and UF unofficial transcript, to hfan@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: Anytime, generally at the beginning of the semester
Website:  http://web.mae.ufl.edu/~hfan/
Project Description: This project involves (1) fabricating devices that consist of hair-thin features and (2) studying fluid behavior in the micro-scale. Microscale valves, pumps, and mixers may need to be integrated in the devices, depending on their applications. The devices are developed for chemical analysis and biomedical applications.

Project Title: Surface Finishing of Medical Components Made with Direct Metal Laser Sintering
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Hitomi Greenslet, hitomiy@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): none
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Junior, Senior, 1 student a term
Prerequisites:  Mechanics of Materials, Materials, Design and Manufacturing Laboratory
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Resume, faculty interview; email one PDF file with all application requirements to Hitomi Greenslet, hitomiy@ufl.edu to request an interview
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring term
Website:  http://plaza.ufl.edu/hitomiy/index.html
Project Description: Additive manufacturing technology enables the manufacture of complex-shaped components. Direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) attracts a high level of interest in medical and aerospace industry because of the process capability and flexibility. This project involves polishing metallic components made using DMLS and studying the polishing characteristics.

Project Title: Photonic Based Methods for Cancer Screening
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: David Hahn, dwhahn@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Dallas Burton, aerochamp3@ufl.edu, Erman Oztekin, eoztekin@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Sophomore, Junior, Senior; 1-2 students per term
Prerequisites:  MAE majors only.  Must have completed DML, Statics, Thermodynamics and MatLab courses.
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Resume, UF unofficial transcripts, faculty interview; email one pdf file of your application materials to David Hahn, dwhahn@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring Term
Website:  http://plaza.ufl.edu/dwhahn/
Project Description: The proposed research seeks to develop novel photonic-based sensing methodologies that provide improved sensitivity and/or specificity for in situ and/or in vivo tissue cancer screening, as well as to aid in the diagnosis and treatment of other chronic diseases of the skin and tissue.  Such an approach has the ultimate potential to increase the percentage of curable cancer cases by promoting detection of the disease at early stages.  The full clinical potential of biophotonic sensing schemes has not yet been realized, and the slow maturation process for point-of-care biophotonics can be attributed to several limiting factors inherent to the complexities of the clinical setting, including significant patient-to-patient variability in optical response.  The proposed research seeks to add a novel new dimension to the optical spectroscopy space (i.e. beyond traditional fluorescence and Raman).  In addition to the research directly focusing on the novel biophotonic sensing scheme, the proposed program also functions to educate and train science and engineering students in the important technology crosscutting areas of biomedical photonics and advanced analytical schemes.  Collaboration with UF College of Medicine may be a part of the research experience.

Project Title #1: Machining of Advanced Engineering Materials
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Yong Huang, yongh@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): TBD per research topics
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level:  Junior, Senior; Up to 2 students per semester
Prerequisites: N/A
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars; future stipend depending on initial performance
Application Requirements: Resume, Statement of research interest, Faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to Yong Huang, yongh@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: Best before the end of preceding semester or within the first two weeks of each semester
Website:  http://plaza.ufl.edu/yongh/
Project Description: Machining, in particular, turning is the most versatile material removal process. At the Florida Advanced Manufacturing and System Integration Lab, we are particularly interested in 1) machining of advanced engineering materials such as 3D printed metals, and 2) study of chip formation process during turning using high speed imaging. Each student may study one of the above topics.

Project Title #2: Process and Material Development for 3D Printing Applications
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Yong Huang, yongh@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): TBD per research topics
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level:  Junior, Senior; Up to 4 students per semester
Prerequisites: N/A
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars; future stipend depending on initial performance
Application Requirements: Resume, Statement of research interest, Faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to Yong Huang, yongh@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: Best before the end of preceding semester or within the first two weeks of each semester
Website:  http://plaza.ufl.edu/yongh/
Project Description: Additive manufacturing (AM), the process of joining materials to make objects from three-dimensional (3D) model data, usually layer by layer, is distinctly a different form and has many advantages over traditional manufacturing processes. Commonly known as “3D printing,” AM provides a cost-effective and time-efficient way to produce low-volume, customized products with complicated geometries and advanced material properties and functionality. At the Florida Advanced Manufacturing and System Integration Lab, our AM/3D printing interest includes: 1) printing process automation (for intersecting jets printing or laser-induced forward transfer), 2) material development for the printing of engineering structures and biological constructs, and 3) organ-on-a-chip development using 3D printing. Each student may study one of the above topics.

Project Title: Theoretical Fluid Dynamics and Turbulence Group
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: S. A. E. Miller, saem@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): TBD
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Sophomore, Junior, Senior; 1-3 students per semester
Prerequisites:  Required: knowledge of differential equations and aero/fluid dynamics. Preferred: Advanced mathematics, numerical methods, programming. Curious, creative, and passionate about fluid dynamics, turbulence, acoustics, and mathematics.
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars; note: pending external and internal developmental support
Application Requirements: Basic online application, resume, UF unofficial transcripts, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to Prof. SAE Miller, saem@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: Before end of preceding semester
Website:  https://faculty.eng.ufl.edu/fluids
Project Description: Two main areas of work are available: (1, Theory/Numerical) – General high risk short term research projects possible in fluid dynamics, turbulence, and acoustics. These are usually highly mathematically based and applied to modeling turbulence or equivalent sources of acoustic radiation. If applying please carefully review provided webpage. (2, Applied) – Development of applied computational fluid dynamic cases for newly developed course in aerospace engineering.

Project Title #1: Graphene Oxide Nano-laminates for Energy, Water Filtration and Biomedical Applications
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Saeed Moghaddam, saeedmog@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Richard Rode, rpr2@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Senior; 2 students per semester
Prerequisites:  none
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: $500 per semester
Application Requirements: Resume, letter(s) of recommendation, statement of research interest, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to Saeed Moghaddam, saeedmog@ufl.edu to request an interview
Application Deadline: none
Website:  http://web.mae.ufl.edu/saeedmog/
Project Description: We have recently developed a very comprehensive understanding about the transport characteristics of species through graphene oxide (GO) laminates. Our results (e.g. Paneri and Moghaddam, Carbon, 2015) suggest that GO laminates have exceptional transport properties and can be very suitable for energy, water filtration and biomedical applications. Under this research, we evaluate the effect of different synthesis conditions on membrane characteristics.

Project Title #2: Impact of Micro- and Nano-textured Surfaces on Physics of Heat and Mass Transfer in Microchannel Flow Boiling Process
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Saeed Moghaddam, saeedmog@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Abdy Fazeli, abfazeli@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Senior; 2 students per semester
Prerequisites:  none
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: $500 per semester
Application Requirements: Resume, letter(s) of recommendation, statement of research interest, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to request an interview to Saeed Moghaddam, saeedmog@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: none
Website:  http://web.mae.ufl.edu/saeedmog/
Project Description: In this research, a new measurement approach in utilized to understand the physics of different microscale heat transfer mechanisms involved in flow boiling in microchannels and to measure their relative contributions to the overall surface heat transfer. Such knowledge is essential to advancing the science and technology of compact and high performance two-phase flow heat sinks for applications such as cooling high performance electronics. The measurement approach involves a high-resolution measurement of the thermal field (temperature and heat flux) at the fluid-solid interface in microchannels. The unique aspect of the measurement approach (Bigham and Moghaddam, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2015 and Bigham and Moghaddam, Applied Physics Letters, 2015) is the implementation of a composite wall with embedded micro-sensors that allow the surface heat flux to be determined. The thermal field measurements are synchronized with the high-speed imaging of bubbles as well as the thickness of the liquid film formed between the vapor and solid phases. The laser interferometry method is utilized in measuring the liquid film thickness.

Project Title #3: Nanostructured Graphene Oxide Based Electrolyzer for Renewable Energy Storage
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Saeed Moghaddam, saeedmog@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Richard Rode, rpr2@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Senior; 1 students per semester
Prerequisites:  none
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Resume, letter(s) of recommendation, statement of research interest, faculty interview; email one pdf file with all application requirements to request an interview to Saeed Moghaddam, saeedmog@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: none
Website:  http://web.mae.ufl.edu/saeedmog/
Project Description: In this research, a graphene oxide laminate developed in Nanostructured Energy Systems (NES) Laboratories will be utilized to develop the next generation electrolyzer membrane electrode assembly for H2 production. This high efficiency system allows to store intermittent solar and wind energies to H2 fuel.

Project Title: Drug Delivery and Fluid Flows in the Brain
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Malisa Sarntinoranont, msarnt@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Magdoom Kulam, mkulam@ufl.edu, or Julan Rey, jrey1009@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Junior, Senior; 2 students per term
Prerequisites:  Mechanics of Materials or Fluid Mechanics
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars; will assist with process
Application Requirements: Resume, faculty interview; email your resume to Malisa Sarntinoranont, msarnt@ufl.edu and drop by my office hours
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring Term
Website:  http://web.mae.ufl.edu/~msarnt/
Project Description: The brain is buoyant within and surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid.  This fluid has similar properties to water, protects the brain from impacts, and acts to transport molecules into and out of the brain. In the fields of Alzheimer’s disease and sleep, there is increasing interest in how interior brain flows contribute to drug delivery and waste clearance into cerebrospinal fluid.  Student projects will focus on some aspect of delivering drugs through interior flows or investigating the role of brain pulsations on flows.   Computational models of the brain are developed from magnetic resonance images.  Experimental models are developed with hydrogels.  Students can focus on either computational or experimental studies.  Since tissue flows are too slow to be measured non-invasively, these studies will provide one way to better understand the physics driving flows and drug delivery.

Project Title: Mechanobiology of Wound Healing
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Chelsey Simmons, css@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Andrés Rubiano, ssjandres@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior; 1-2 students per term
Prerequisites:  Ability to commit at least 9 hrs/week in keeping with 1 credit requirement (see below)
Credit:  1-3 credits via EGN 4912 (must enroll for at least one credit each semester, each credit = ~ 9 hrs/week in lab)
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Visit and review website, attend open house, faculty interview; email your resume and a 1 paragraph statement of interest once all requirements are met to Chelsey Simmons css@ufl.edu to request an interview. If you have not attended open house, your resume will not be reviewed.
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring Term
Website:  www.gatorbaitlabs.com
Project Description: While many amphibians can regrow entire limbs and organs, examples of mammalian regeneration are very limited. Recently, we have identified a remarkable mammal that has regenerative ability – the African Spiny Mouse (Acomys). Preliminary data from collaborations between the Simmons group and medical and biology researchers across UF are exciting and intriguing: Acomys tissues do not exhibit fibrosis (scarring) when repairing damage. Understanding fibrosis is thus the key to unlocking the secrets of regeneration. The REU participant will perform research to test the hypothesis that mechanical stimuli can direct regeneration by providing controlled mechanical stimulation of cells from regenerative (Acomys) and normal (Mus) mice.

Project Title: Atomistic Simulation of High Rate Behavior of Materials
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Douglas Spearot, dspearot@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): none
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Sophomore, Junior, 1-2 students a term
Prerequisites:  Core courses in Materials, Engineering Mechanics and Mechanics of Materials; programming experience is highly useful
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN 4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: resume, faculty interview; email resume to Douglas Spearot, dspearot@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring term
Website:  http://web.mae.ufl.edu/~dspearot
Project Description: Atomistic simulation is a computational technique used to study the mechanical behavior of materials with atomic scale resolution. This project involves an analysis of dislocations and grain boundaries in metallic materials under high-rate loading conditions.

Project Title: Development of Autonomous Mobile Agents (Robots)
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentors: Eric Schwartz, ems@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): N/A
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior; 15-50 students per term
Prerequisites:  A desire to learn and work with others.
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN4912
Stipend: None unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Faculty interview; visit my office in MAEC 106 on a MW or F afternoon
Application Deadline: None
Website:   www.mil.ufl.edu
Project Description: MIL provides a cross-disciplinary synergistic environment dedicated to the study and development of intelligent, autonomous robots. We conduct research in the theory and realization of autonomous mobile agents covering topics such as machine learning, real-time sensor integration (including computer vision, LADAR, sonar, radar, IMU, etc.), optimization, and control. Applications of MIL research (that have produced functioning robots) include autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), autonomous water surface vehicles (ASVs), autonomous land vehicles (ALVs), and autonomous aerial vehicles (AAVs).

Project Title: The Impact of Graft Design on Endovascular Repairs
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Roger Tran-Son-Tay, rtst@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): Rosamaria Tricarico, r.tricarico@ufl.edu
Terms Available: Fall, Spring, Summer
Student Level: Freshman, Sophomore, Junior, Senior; 1-2 students per term
Prerequisites:  none, however, knowledge of fluid mechanics would be useful.
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Resume, UF unofficial transcripts, faculty interview; email one pdf file of your application materials to Roger Tran-Son-Tay, rtst@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: March 1 for Summer and Fall terms; November 1 for Spring Term
Website:  http://www2.mae.ufl.edu/cellmech/
Project Description: Advanced endografting techniques represent a significant opportunity for treatment of aortic arch aneurysms and/or dissections [10-13].  However, the impact of device design, especially on branch vessel perfusion has not been studied extensively.  Despite the use of custom device use and early feasibility studies with branch device concepts [14-16], additional information is needed to ensure that new device concepts are safe and reduce clinical complications such as branch vessel malperfusion and stroke.  Computational fluid mechanics modeling represents a powerful tool to assess the impact of device design features on hemodynamic parameters using patient-based anatomical and hemodynamic data (Fig. 2).  The objective of this project is to evaluate the hemodynamic impact of changes in stent size (diameter, length) and/or stent design (shape, angle of curvature) for devices placed in idealized aortic branch anatomy using computational fluid dynamic modeling.  The study would incorporate 3D schematic anatomies mirroring real patients’ aortic arch geometries, dimensions, and hemodynamics (flow rates, pressures). Fluid dynamic simulations and analysis will describe how each structural change influences the flow and its features.

Project Title: Jet Facility Development and Characterization for Noise Research
Department: Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering
Faculty Mentor: Lawrence Ukeiley, ukeiley@ufl.edu
Ph.D. Student Mentor(s): N/A
Terms Available: Fall, Spring
Student Level: Junior, Senior; 1-2 students per term
Prerequisites:  Fluid Mechanics or Aerodynamics
Credit:  0-3 credits via EGN4912
Stipend: none unless selected for University Scholars
Application Requirements: Resume, faculty interview; email one pdf file of your application materials to Lawrence Ukeiley, ukeiley@ufl.edu
Application Deadline: none
Website: http://ufdg.mae.ufl.edu/
Project Description: The project involves developing a free jet for the UF Anechoic wind tunnel that will be used for the study of noise sources. The project will involve the development of the air delivery system for the jet as well flow and acoustics measurements of the jet once built.