SEMINAR – LONG WANG DOCTORAL CANDIDATE, DEPARTMENT OF STRUCTURAL ENGINEERING

Date/Time

02/12/2019
3:10 pm-4:00 pm
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Location

365C WEIL HALL
1949 Stadium Rd
Gainesville, FL 32611

Details

Multifunctional Materials for Human-Centered Smart Infrastructure
Systems

The overarching research goal is to lay the foundation of the next-generation paradigm in
human-centered smart infrastructure systems, specifically, by designing and leveraging
high-performance multifunctional materials for structural and human health monitoring.
The integration of human performance monitoring with the design of smart infrastructure
systems is necessary for addressing pressing societal needs, such as hazard mitigation,
construction workforce management, and remote senior/patient healthcare, among others.
In fact, it is known that extreme events threaten the safety of infrastructure systems and
its occupants. In addition, the performance of engineered structures and biological systems
can degrade over its lifetime. Robust sensing systems play a vital role in characterizing
damage features while facilitating decision-making and timely interventions (e.g.,
for early warning). Structural health monitoring (SHM) and wearable technologies can
potentially monitor the performance of engineered structures (i.e., civil, aerospace, and
marine structures) and the human system, respectively. However, the complex damage
modes, drastically different materials, intricate geometries, and diverse operational environments
make it challenging for conventional sensors to effectively quantify structural
health and human performance. Multifunctional materials, on the other hand, can be designed
using a bottom-up approach and realize novel sensing mechanisms and technologies
that could be better suited for extracting relevant damage features and tailored for
specific engineering applications. This presentation will outline how carbon nanotubeand
graphene-based nanocomposite thin films are designed and implemented for both
SHM and human health monitoring. This work not only enhances the scientific understanding
of multi-scale mechanical and electromechanical properties of nanocomposites,
but it also potentially bridges the gap of transitioning nano-/micro-scale material properties
to achieve high-performance macro-scale multifunctional systems. Future research
will focus on how to integrate and advance these technologies for achieving nextgeneration,
human-centered, smart infrastructure systems.

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