Florida Engineering Experiment Station

The Florida Engineering Experiment Station (FLEXStation) is an arm of the Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering at the University of Florida dedicated to driving economic and workforce development around the state and strengthening Florida’s role in the global innovation economy.

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UF Engineer Brings Changes to Florida’s K-12 STEM Education

Early assessments of the Engaging Quality Instruction through Professional Development (EQuIPD) program are revealing its impressive impact among Florida teachers. The EQuIPD program, led by the Department of Materials Science & Engineering Senior Lecturer Nancy Ruzycki, Ph.D., is funded through a $5 million Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) grant and specially designed to support teachers in learning new instruction techniques.

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HWCOE's researcher Honored at Virtual Standing InnOvation Event

Mark Tehranipoor, Ph.D., Intel Charles E. Young Preeminence Endowed Chair Professor in Cybersecurity in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, and director of FICS received recognition at the virtual Standing InnOvation Awards for his Nimbis software security models.

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ELI and EII Soar Past Goals for Academic Year 2019-2020

The Engineering Innovation Institute (EII), an integral part of FLEXStation made a 22% increase in student enrollment from last year. Additionally, this past year saw 2,160 unique combined student enrollments (Innovation and Leadership Institutes) in the curricula offered, continuing a ~30% annual enrollment growth rate for the two Institutes since inception.

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UF Engineer Brings Changes to Florida’s K-12 STEM Education

Early assessments of the Engaging Quality Instruction through Professional Development (EQuIPD) program are revealing its impressive impact among Florida teachers. The EQuIPD program, led by the Department of Materials Science & Engineering Senior Lecturer Nancy Ruzycki, Ph.D., is funded through a $5 million Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) grant and specially designed to support teachers in learning new instruction techniques.

Read MoreFeatured News