Careers

The world is a rapidly changing place. And the problems we face are evolving just as quickly. To solve them, we need a new breed of thinker. An engineer who’s well-versed in how the real world works. Someone who’s eager to reach across disciplines, form strong relationships within the community, and lead teams to find breakthroughs – which make all of our lives better.

Powering the New EngineerThe epicenter of this shift in the engineering landscape is found here at the Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering. We are Powering the New Engineer to energize people, foster creativity, and create a culture where bold and inspiring ideas shape the future.

Be a part of this renaissance. The Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering is hiring faculty members across all disciplines.

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Meet your colleagues


   Understanding major storms saves lives

Understanding major storms saves lives

In the wake of deadly storms, which have devastated regions around the world, the University of Florida is working to understand how they form, how they move and how to construct buildings to weather them. Through the efforts of W.P. Bushnell Endowed Professor Dr. Kamran Mohseni, Dr. David Prevatt and Dr. Forrest Masters, we are gaining critical insights that will lead to better preparations and ultimately save lives.

Using an interdisciplinary approach, Dr. Mohseni is developing tiny autonomous air drones that fly into a hurricane to gather critical atmospheric data. But the ocean is what ultimately fuels a hurricane, so to track its intensity and trajectory you need to understand the relationship between air and water. Again, departments are working together to build sea drones to transmit data while being carried through the circling currents.

Dr. Prevatt, from the Department of Civil and Coastal Engineering, is researching how buildings can be made stronger in order to stand up to extreme winds from hurricanes and tornadoes. His findings include using relatively inexpensive clips and straps to keep roofs attached to walls and walls attached to foundations.

Debris carried by the storms can be just as damaging, so Dr. Masters has studied how asphalt roof shingles perform under storm conditions and how pruning affects tree movement during high winds. He’s even placed himself in the paths of storms to get essential data to aid in developing hurricane-proof homes.

The work is important, and we know the end result is just as significant. Making life safer for people around the world. That’s Powering the New Engineer.

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Dr. Fan Ren brings a greater purpose to chemical engineering

Dr. Fan Ren brings a greater purpose to chemical engineering

Dr. Fan Ren is pioneering the use of sensors to detect potential medical problems, including a low-cost sensor that can measure glucose without drawing blood. That’s a huge advancement for those who prick their fingers several times a day.

Despite winning numerous awards, as well as being the first recipient of the University of Florida Foundation’s new Preeminence Term Professorship, Dr. Ren is not resting. In fact after receiving the $25,000 award that comes with the preeminence recognition, he stated, “There’s still much to be done in making people’s lives better.”

By never losing sight of the societal impact of his work, Fan Ren is Powering the New Engineer.

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Dr. Michele Manuel and Dr. Kelly Jordan receive major recognition

Dr. Michele Manuel and Dr. Kelly Jordan receive major recognition

Dr. Michele Manuel and Dr. Kelly Jordan are two faculty members attracting national recognition. Dr. Manuel, who specializes in material design and prototyping, has received multiple awards including the NASA Early Career Award, and was chosen by the National Science Foundation to attend an event at the White House, hosted by First Lady Michelle Obama. Dr. Jordan’s work on a High Flux Neutron Source beam instrument was named one of 2013’s top 100 technology products by R&D Magazine.

While it’s humbling to receive accolades, it’s the positive impact our work has on people’s lives that really inspires our engineers. And that’s Powering the New Engineer.

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UF launches new institute to understand transportation from every angle

UF launches new institute to understand transportation from every angle

Rush hour gridlock. It’s a frustrating reality many of us face on a daily basis. But the Herbert Wertheim College of Engineering knows solving that problem does more than just reduce road rage. It moves people and products from place to place more efficiently, which helps drive the economy. That’s why we recently formed the University of Florida Transportation Institute, which conducts interdisciplinary research on traffic patterns as well as public safety, alternative energies, autonomous vehicles and more. All of which will ultimately make the transportation process run smoothly.

Not only do we work across departments all over campus, but with state and federal government too. Together we gather critical data and form solutions that will keep us all moving in the right direction. Making life flow better is Powering the New Engineer.

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Biomedical is turning breakthroughs into cures

Biomedical is turning breakthroughs into cures

Thanks to a team approach that brings scientists, engineers and clinicians together, the J. Crayton Pruitt Family Department of Biomedical Engineering is bringing faculty from multiple disciplines together to make major strides toward developing new technologies that will have a significant impact on patient’s lives. Dr. Carlos Rinaldi, joint professor of Biomedical Engineering and Chemical Engineering, has made advancements in the biomedical applications of magnetic nanoparticles. He’s using them to kill cancer cells. Which means better treatments for cancer patients. According to Dr. Jon Dobson, joint professor of Biomedical Engineering and Materials Science & Engineering and director of the Institute for Cell Engineering and Regenerative Medicine, the collaborative effort is beginning to “bear real fruit in the form of clinical applications.”

By combining our strengths and working together, we’re Powering the New Engineer.

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